Tag Archives: child

Paediatric Basic Life Support

 

 

 

For those of you near Rayleigh, Essex, might want to join us for our next Paediatric Basic Life Support session on 21st June 2012.

This short first aid training session is aimed at anyone interested in the basic steps to take in a medical emergency involving a child.

During this paediatric basic life support session you cover: CPR; Choking; Care of an unconscious child and dealing with injuries.

The session ends with an open forum for questions.

The session is running at a child care venue, starting at 1930 and finishing around 2100. Call 0800 242 5210 for more details and to book your space.

Keep up with us on Netmums

Lazarus training is continuing its programme of short CPR sessions aimed at parents and carers.

To make it as easy as possible for you to keep up with the dates, and to ensure you don’t miss your chance to practice your life saving skills, we have starting loading details of our CPR training events onto the popular Netmums website.

We will still list the details on our Facebook page and of course you can contact the office on 0800 242 5210.

Enjoy bonfire night- but if…

Sparkler Nov 2011

Prevention is better than cure, so stay safe this bonfire night. But if someone was to get burnt remember the following simple steps:

Cool it down– use water to cool the burnt area. The cooling should continue for a few minutes at least, but more typically 10 minutes to ensure the area is really cool.

Cover it up– cover the burnt area with something clean and hopefully sterile. In emergencies a wet towel is often used, but ensure whatever is used will not stick to the burnt area and that it isn’t wrapped to tight- burnt hands and limbs often swell up.

If outside be careful that only the burnt area is cooled and that the person isn’t soaked, they will often get very cold, very quick.

If the burn is blistered or any clothing or material is stuck to the burnt area, do not interfere with this, just cover over the top.

Anything but the smallest of burns should be treated seriously, particularly in children. A rough guide in adults is any burn[s] the size of the persons hand or bigger, or in a child – bigger than a 50 pence piece should be professionally assessed.